Dental Composite Materials for Direct Restorations (2024)

Related Papers

Dental update

Strategies to overcome polymerization shrinkage--materials and techniques. A review

2010 •

Neeraj Malhotra

Stress generation at tissue/resin composite interfaces is one of the important reasons for failure of resin-based composite (RBC) restorations owing to the inherent property of polymerization shrinkage. Unrelieved stresses can weaken the bond between the tooth structure and the restoration, eventually producing a gap at the restoration margins. This can lead to postoperative sensitivity, secondary caries, fracture of the restorations, marginal deterioration and discoloration. As polymerization shrinkage cannot be eliminated completely, various techniques and protocols have been suggested in the manipulation of, and restorative procedures for, RBCs to minimize the shrinkage and associated stresses. Introduction of various newer monomer systems (siloranes) may also overcome this problem of shrinkage stress. This review emphasizes the various material science advances and techniques advocated that are currently available or under trial/testing phase to deal with polymerization shrinkag...

View PDF

Clinical Oral Investigations

Evaluation of the mechanical properties of dental adhesives and glass-ionomer cements

2010 •

Elisa Magni

View PDF

American journal of dentistry

A double-blind randomized clinical trial of a silorane-based resin composite in class 2 restorations: 18-month follow-up

2013 •

Audrey Bueno, Fabiana Gonçalves

To compare the clinical performance of a silorane-based with a methacrylate-based restorative system in class 2 restorations after an 18-month follow-up. This randomized, double-blind and controlled study included 33 subjects receiving 100 direct resin composite restorations that were completely randomized to silorane-based group (Filtek P90/Silorane System Adhesive - 3M ESPE) or methacrylate-based group (Filtek P60/Adper SE Plus - 3M ESPE). The restorative system was determined by chance using a coin toss until 50 units for each group were completed. Each subject contributed with one to seven restorations. A single operator performed all of the restorative procedures. Two calibrated examiners (kw > or = 0.7) assessed the restorations at baseline and after 18 months according to modified United States Public Health System (USPHS) criteria. The data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed rank and Kaplan-Meier survival curves (alpha = 0.05). After 18 months, 88 res...

View PDF

Dental Materials

Two year clinical evaluation of a low-shrink resin composite material in UK general dental practices

2011 •

Email Helps-Desk

View PDF

Compendium of continuing education in dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J. : 1995)

Resin-based composite as a direct esthetic restorative material

2011 •

Shashirashmi Acharya, Neeraj Malhotra

The search for an ideal esthetic material for tooth restoration has resulted in significant improvements in both materials and the techniques for using them. Various resin-based composite (RBC) materials have recently been introduced into the market that offer improved esthetic and physical properties. This article reviews RBCs, including their compositions, advantages, and disadvantages, that are contemporary to today's clinical practice as well as those that are under research consideration and/ or in clinical trial phase.

View PDF

Lasers in Medical Science

Bonding strength of silorane-based composite to Er-YAG laser prepared dentin

2013 •

Dimitrios Dionysopoulos, Pantelis Kouros

View PDF

Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry

Does the use of a novel self-adhesive flowable composite reduce nanoleakage?

2015 •

Abeer Abo El Naga, Sherif Fayez, Cherif Fayez

The aim of the study reported here was to evaluate the performance of a self-adhesive flowable composite and two self-etching adhesive systems, when subjected to cyclic loading, in preventing the nanoleakage of Class V restorations. Wedge-shape Class V cavities were prepared (4×2×2 mm [length × width × depth]) on the buccal surfaces of 90 sound human premolars. Cavities were divided randomly into three groups (n=30) according to the used adhesive (Xeno(®) V [self-etching adhesive system]) and BOND-1(®) SF (solvent-free self-etching adhesive system) in conjunction with Artiste(®) Nano Composite resin, and Fusio™ Liquid Dentin (self-adhesive flowable composite), consecutively. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10): (A) control, (B) subjected to occlusal cyclic loading (90N for 5,000 cycles), and (C) subjected to occlusal cyclic loading (90N for 10,000 cycles). Teeth then were coated with nail polish up to 1 mm from the interface, immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution for 24 hours and tested for nanoleakage using the environmental scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis X-ray analysis. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (P≤0.05). The Fusio Liquid Dentin group showed statistically significant lower percentages of silver penetration (0.55 μ) compared with the BOND-1 SF (3.45 μ) and Xeno V (3.82 μ) groups, which were not statistically different from each other, as they both showed higher silver penetration. Under the test conditions, the self-adhesive flowable composite provided better sealing ability. Aging of the two tested adhesive systems, as a function of cyclic loading, increased nanoleakage.

View PDF

Post-operative sensitivity on direct resin composite restorations: clinical practice guidelines

Isabel Porto

Pain is one of the most frequent reasons for seeking dental treatment and clinical observations confirm that patients complain of dentinal sensitivity under different conditions and degrees of intensity. This is a very frequent problem after dental restorations with resin composite, even when there is no visible failure in the restoration. The aim of this bibliographic review was to identify the causes of post-operative sensitivity in resin composite restorations and how it can be avoided so that professionals can use this information to reduce the occurrence of this inconvenience in their daily practice. Complete texts of relevant articles on the subject were analysed. There are various causes of post-operative sensitivity in direct resin composite restorations related to failures in diagnosis and indications for treatment and/or cavity preparation, the stages of hybridization of hard dental tissues, insertion of the material, and finishing and polishing the restoration. To avoid o...

View PDF

Post-operative sensitivity in direct resin composite restorations: Clinical practice guidelines

Isabel Porto

Pain is one of the most frequent reasons for seeking dental treatment and clinical observations confirm that patients complain of dentinal sensitivity under different conditions and degrees of intensity. This is a very frequent problem after dental restorations with resin composite, even when there is no visible failure in the restoration. The aim of this bibliographic review was to identify the causes of post-operative sensitivity in resin composite restorations and how it can be avoided so that professionals can use this information to reduce the occurrence of this inconvenience in their daily practice. Complete texts of relevant articles on the subject were analysed. There are various causes of post-operative sensitivity in direct resin composite restorations related to failures in diagnosis and indications for treatment and/or cavity preparation, the stages of hybridization of hard dental tissues, insertion of the material, and finishing and polishing the restoration. To avoid or minimize the occurrence of post-operative sensitivity, it is imperative to make a good diagnosis and use the correct technique at all stages of the restorative procedure.

View PDF
Dental Composite Materials for Direct Restorations (2024)

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Golda Nolan II

Last Updated:

Views: 6181

Rating: 4.8 / 5 (78 voted)

Reviews: 93% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Golda Nolan II

Birthday: 1998-05-14

Address: Suite 369 9754 Roberts Pines, West Benitaburgh, NM 69180-7958

Phone: +522993866487

Job: Sales Executive

Hobby: Worldbuilding, Shopping, Quilting, Cooking, Homebrewing, Leather crafting, Pet

Introduction: My name is Golda Nolan II, I am a thoughtful, clever, cute, jolly, brave, powerful, splendid person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.